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The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition.  2001-05.
 
mysteries
 
 
in Greek and Roman religion, some important secret cults. The conventional religions of both Greeks and Romans were alike in consisting principally of propitiation and prayers for the good of the city-state, the tribe, or the family, and only secondarily of the person. Individuals sought a more emotional religion that would fulfill their desires for personal salvation and immortality. Secret societies were formed, usually headed by a priest or a hierophant. By the 5th cent. B.C. mysteries were an important part of the fabric of Hellenic life. Although the mystic rites were kept secret, it was known that they required elaborate initiations, including purification rites, beholding sacred objects, accepting occult knowledge, and acting out a sacred drama. Some mysteries were of foreign origin, such as the Middle Eastern cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithra; some were embodied survivals of indigenous rites. The most important mystery cults in Greece were the Eleusinian, the Orphic, and the Andanian. Since the mystery deities were associated primarily with fertility, many scholars believe that these cults were based on unrecorded primitive fertility rites. The popularity of mystery cults spread in the Hellenistic age and still more widely in Roman times.    1
See L. Farnell, The Cults of the Greek States (5 vol., 18961909); J. Campbell, ed., Eranos Yearbooks, The Mysteries (tr. 1955); W. Borhert, Ancient Mystery Cults (1987); M. Meyer, ed., The Ancient Mysteries (1987).    2
 
 
The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. Copyright 2001-05 Columbia University Press.

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